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Posts tagged: health care

I had my father get sick when I was 22. And I was poor, alright. And my father had an ulcer, and it exploded and you know all these toxins get in your blood. And basically, my father died, whatever, 50 days after his ulcer. So I had a father get sick while I was poor.

My mother got sick when I was rich. And my mother, you know… I don’t really want to get into it, but my mother was sicker than my father. And my mother’s alive. My mother’s fine, OK? I remember going to the hospital to see my mother and wondering, ‘Was I in the right place?’ Like, this was a hotel. Like it had a concierge, man.

People don’t… if the average person really knew the discrepancy in the health care system, there’d be riots in the streets, OK? They would burn this motherfucker down!”

Chris Rock [video]

Bringing this back, because some people don’t seem to understand that there is a discrepancy in the quality of care among poor, middle-class, and wealthy people, NO MATTER HOW DEBILITATING THEIR RESPECTIVE DISEASES MAY BE.

(via cgdageek)

I asked my mom to help me find new insurance since the one I’m on has been screwing me over. The one she found will cover birth control only if I don’t use it to prevent pregnancy. I have to use it for other help purposes if I want it covered.

scifigrl47:

claudiagray:

vixyish:

thebicker:

mediamattersforamerica:

**45,000 Americans Die Each Year Due To Lack Of Health Insurance.**
But Fox News claims that no one in the U.S. has ever been denied health care. Here are just a few examples proving them wrong:
Twelve-Year-Old Died In 2007 From Abscessed Tooth After His Family’s Medicaid Lapsed.
Seventeen-Year-Old’s Insurance Revoked After He Tests HIV Positive.
Woman Denied Coverage For Breast Cancer Because She Wasn’t Diagnosed At Correct Clinic.
Woman’s Double Mastectomy Denied Over Disputed Acne Treatment.
9/11 Responders Without Insurance Face Inferior Coverage For Sustained Injuries.

This is what Republicans are fighting to preserve.

This is what Republicans are fighting to preserve.

I am, as most of you following me know, an author. This means I am self-employed. (No, you don’t get insurance coverage from your publisher.) I am also single, so I do not have a spouse employed at a large company whose insurance I can be folded into. 
I have medical insurance. I pay through the nose for it, and it’s awful; virtually every time I get a prescription filled, the pharmacist makes a comment about how it’s the highest copay they’ve ever seen on that medicine. Thank God I am in generally good health, and thus far have not had to test how long my insurance company would stand by me if I needed cancer treatment, or serious surgery. But virtually no one stays in good health forever. (Really the only way to avoid that is dying young and suddenly in some sort of terrible accident, which is not a scenario I wish for.) I have little trust in my insurance’s good-faith dealing in a situation where I suddenly am costing them money instead of paying it into their coffers. 
Last year, I tried to purchase another insurance policy — a better one, with a larger company that I thought might treat me better. Like I said, I am generally in good health. For this policy, I was willing to pay an amount of money per month that adds up to more than half of my mortgage. But for good health care, I’d pay it. 
I was denied. Why? For three weeks, some months before, I had taken an antibiotic to clear up an infected scratch. The antibiotic was a generic. The cost for the entire bottle = $11. That made me too risky. 
Some people read these horror stories and think they’re just cherry-picking for political purposes. However, I live with the constant knowledge that this is something very, very likely to happen to me if I ever have the gall to be a mortal human being and get sick. 
The current system is broken. All I ask is a fair chance to buy a product, and the market denies me that chance at any price. 
I view the current standoff as nothing short of the Republican party telling me that, as a law-abiding, taxpaying citizen of the United States, because I do not work for a large company, if I get seriously ill, I deserve to die. 

A few years ago, a friend of mine was determined to quit her retail job.  She had a better job.  A job that paid better, hours were better, better everything.  I told her, stay on at the retail job.  Just part time. 
Because her new job didn’t offer health insurance.  And having watched my mother die of cancer, having seen the astronomical bills for her treatment, I was terrified of not having insurance. 
I was at Disney, in line for the Haunted Mansion when I got the text that she was in the ICU.  That she’d been diagnosed with a congenital heart defect and needed a pacemaker.  She was barely thirty.
And my first thought, my very first thought was, “Oh, God, please, please let her still have insurance.”  It was a prayer, an honest to goodness prayer, and I do not pray often.  But I stood there, too far away to do anything else.
And when you are told that your friend might be dying, that she might never be well again, that hell, I might never see her again, your first thought shouldn’t be, “How is she going to pay for this?”
No one should ever have to think that.

scifigrl47:

claudiagray:

vixyish:

thebicker:

mediamattersforamerica:

**45,000 Americans Die Each Year Due To Lack Of Health Insurance.**

But Fox News claims that no one in the U.S. has ever been denied health care. Here are just a few examples proving them wrong:

This is what Republicans are fighting to preserve.

This is what Republicans are fighting to preserve.

I am, as most of you following me know, an author. This means I am self-employed. (No, you don’t get insurance coverage from your publisher.) I am also single, so I do not have a spouse employed at a large company whose insurance I can be folded into. 

I have medical insurance. I pay through the nose for it, and it’s awful; virtually every time I get a prescription filled, the pharmacist makes a comment about how it’s the highest copay they’ve ever seen on that medicine. Thank God I am in generally good health, and thus far have not had to test how long my insurance company would stand by me if I needed cancer treatment, or serious surgery. But virtually no one stays in good health forever. (Really the only way to avoid that is dying young and suddenly in some sort of terrible accident, which is not a scenario I wish for.) I have little trust in my insurance’s good-faith dealing in a situation where I suddenly am costing them money instead of paying it into their coffers. 

Last year, I tried to purchase another insurance policy — a better one, with a larger company that I thought might treat me better. Like I said, I am generally in good health. For this policy, I was willing to pay an amount of money per month that adds up to more than half of my mortgage. But for good health care, I’d pay it. 

I was denied. Why? For three weeks, some months before, I had taken an antibiotic to clear up an infected scratch. The antibiotic was a generic. The cost for the entire bottle = $11. That made me too risky. 

Some people read these horror stories and think they’re just cherry-picking for political purposes. However, I live with the constant knowledge that this is something very, very likely to happen to me if I ever have the gall to be a mortal human being and get sick. 

The current system is broken. All I ask is a fair chance to buy a product, and the market denies me that chance at any price. 

I view the current standoff as nothing short of the Republican party telling me that, as a law-abiding, taxpaying citizen of the United States, because I do not work for a large company, if I get seriously ill, I deserve to die. 

A few years ago, a friend of mine was determined to quit her retail job.  She had a better job.  A job that paid better, hours were better, better everything.  I told her, stay on at the retail job.  Just part time. 

Because her new job didn’t offer health insurance.  And having watched my mother die of cancer, having seen the astronomical bills for her treatment, I was terrified of not having insurance. 

I was at Disney, in line for the Haunted Mansion when I got the text that she was in the ICU.  That she’d been diagnosed with a congenital heart defect and needed a pacemaker.  She was barely thirty.

And my first thought, my very first thought was, “Oh, God, please, please let her still have insurance.”  It was a prayer, an honest to goodness prayer, and I do not pray often.  But I stood there, too far away to do anything else.

And when you are told that your friend might be dying, that she might never be well again, that hell, I might never see her again, your first thought shouldn’t be, “How is she going to pay for this?”

No one should ever have to think that.

IN THE UNITED STATES

dannybriereisaliferuiner:

owning a gun

  • is a right

having healthcare

  • is a privilege

image

to-goboldly:

thepausebutton:

You’re bad at this, Rush Limbaugh. You don’t even understand how babies are made, let alone how people can have sex without making a baby, and you would like the government to take over decision-making on these issues on your say-so. And you don’t get it. You biologically don’t get it. You just don’t understand it. You were absent that day. - Rachel Maddow

Oh Rachel, I love you for this segment.

This segment was flawless.

bebinn:

Save $5 on Plan B One-Step™
You have 72 hours after birth control failure or unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. The sooner you take emergency contraception, the better it works. Plan B One-Step™ is available over the counter for consumers 17 and older.
Present this at any retail pharmacy (it can’t be used at government subsidized clinics, unfortunately) for up to two purchases of Plan B One-Step™. It’s valid for both prescription and non-prescription purchases.
Reblog so your followers can have it, too!

bebinn:

Save $5 on Plan B One-Step™

You have 72 hours after birth control failure or unprotected sex to prevent pregnancy. The sooner you take emergency contraception, the better it works. Plan B One-Step™ is available over the counter for consumers 17 and older.

Present this at any retail pharmacy (it can’t be used at government subsidized clinics, unfortunately) for up to two purchases of Plan B One-Step™. It’s valid for both prescription and non-prescription purchases.

Reblog so your followers can have it, too!